Category: Careers Page 2 of 599

A new outlook on life

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to be at the start of a new era? It’s a … feeling of … and a great … –booster as well.As a mom of two, I’ve had to share my life b

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to be at the start of a new era? It’s a thrilling feeling of achievement, and a great confidence –booster as well.

As a mom of two, I’ve had to share my life between my family and my job in a school. I’ve spent long days and nights caring for the others, until, one day after years, I came upon my son’s newly purchased computer.

Since then I’ve been a computer addict -(mind you, I didn’t even know how to turn it on at first!)- and I finally got started in my new online career: Book Reviewing!

It had never occurred to me that I could get all that information from the web; after all, my son and daughter used it only for playing games for hours on end. But it proved to be a very useful tool to me, and to my kids in the long run.

At first , everyone in the family teased me watching me try to learn all the nuts and bolts of this device.

‘It’s for the kids,’ my husband would say. ‘You will only get frustrated and tired. It’s not for you, at your age!’

However, I was not discouraged!
‘What’s wrong with my age? Being in my forties is not a problem . I can still learn a
lot !’ I would reply.

And I was right. After a couple of months of perseverance , I started feeling confident enough to handle it , and now, my kids started asking me to explain to them a couple of tech things! Imagine that!

I still can’t believe it I’ve learned so many things all on my own. Of course , I was always trying to find some spare time –and that was the hardest part of it – but in the end I followed a specific timetable that proved to be a very good idea. I had also to buy a book about the Internet , a mini guide , but the rest of the information was available online. Apart from getting educated in this field, I’ve also made some great new friends all over the world.

Book reviewing was an unexpected activity I came across while reading a newsletter online. Since I’m an avid reader , I took to it at once. Now, I review print books, e-books, I maintain my own site online and I send articles to various sites all over the world. Freelancing online is a great way to reach people and places everywhere on the planet.

Coming back to book reviewing, I find it great as I get a lot of free copies from authors and companies from all over the world, and I add them to my bookshelf. Reviewing other people’s books has also helped me to learn how to write my own book . I have even learnt how to make a PDF book, an electronic book . I would like to share some information with you in case you are interested in becoming a book reviewer.

But you may wish to ask : Why become a reviewer?

There are several reasons for that choice. First, because you love books. If you are also an avid reader, you just can’t miss this chance !

Second, you love writing. This is imperative. If you don’t love writing, forget all about it.

Next, you want to get free copies and add them to your shelf. By all means , go ahead.

Moreover, you can have the latest releases. If this sounds exciting to you, then this activity it’s the ideal one for you.

If you take to all of the above, you just can’t afford to miss the opportunity to become a reviewer. Yet, there may be another problem: you doubt your abilities to write a good review. You feel you need some guidance on how to write a critique. There is an easy solution:

Read other people’s reviews.

I’ve done that and it worked! So, you can do it too.
I learnt all about reviewing online , all on my own. You only have to be patient and study as many different reviews as possible. Here comes another question:

But where can I find reviews to read?

Practically, everywhere. But if you would like to find some specific sites that display reviews online you can visit my site at http://lianametal.tripod.com
and click on the Reviews section. There you will find a lot of URLs of sites that I send my work to. Click on each one of them and read the reviews. You can read my reviews, and other people’s reviews. Watch the style and the language . See what comes first and what is next. The more you read , the more you learn.

If you visit my site , you will see an e books link on the home page. If you click on it, you will find another site dedicated to e books. There you will find my e book titled Writing Basics, which includes a lot of information on reviewing.

To sum up, if I’ve done it, you can do it too! And it’s never too late to learn something new and exciting that will help you change your outlook on life! I am always searching the net for something new that will add some spice to my life. After all, I have nothing to lose, only to gain!

What about you?

If you feel like I doArticle Submission, start now. Don’t miss the thrill and fun of it!

And Good Luck!

Liana Metal

Reviewer/writer

http://lianametal.tripod.com

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Liana Metal is a reviewer and writer based in Europe. Visit her at http://lianametal.tripod.com , read her articles, and contribute. Her new books are at www.ebookad.com










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Liana Metal is a reviewer and writer based in Europe. Visit her at http://lianametal.tripod.com , read her articles, and contribute. Her new books are at www.ebookad.com

What a career coach can or cannot do for you

What a Career Coach Can or Can’t Do for YouI want to start with what I think good career coaches do for people who … for new jobs, facing … ready to retire, but want to work longer,

What a Career Coach Can or Can’t Do for You

I want to start with what I think good career coaches do for people who are
looking for new jobs, facing downsizing, ready to retire, but want to work longer,
etc. Any category of job seeker is who we want to work with. I’ll start
with my own definition..

1. Coaches can become friends with you. Friends of a kind that you can tell
your secrets to and not fear recrimination or judgement about you and your
decisions.

2. Coaches have resources for you. All kinds of resources to give you or ask you
to find for yourself. They are: videos, books, websites, people, you name it.
These resources are meant to awaken your desire to find the information that only
you need to make a career decision.

4. Coaches guide you towards the decisions you want to make. Most
job seekers know what they want, but need confirmation of what they
really want to do, regardless of how zany the choices may be. The career
coach helps the job hunter make firm decisions.

5. The career coach is also a cheerleader. A cheerleader who wants the job seeker
to win, and win at the job or career decision

What a Career Coach Cannot Do: The coach is not a therapist and cannot
solve deep personal problems. However, the coaching experience may be
therapeutic with the job seeker becoming more authentic in the coaching
process, simply by having a person who is interested in their welfare.

A career coach is not someone who can solve your financial problems either.
Talking about what you need to do as a joint venture about how money
affects you is a possibility in the coaching process, but not how to spend
or budget money. That’s the kind of advice a financial advisor is better
suited to handle.

Lastly, a good career coach is a person who can celebrate with you when you
have successes. The coach will be there when you need more information,
resourcesComputer Technology Articles, or just a pat on the back. Go find one when you need career
help.

Article Tags:
Career Coach

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

c, 2004
Permission is granted to reprint, not
for commercial use
Marilyn J. Tellez, M.A.
Certified Job & Career Transition Coach
Email: doitnow@nwinfo.net
Web: www.doitnowcareers.info










Article Tags:
Career Coach

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

c, 2004
Permission is granted to reprint, not
for commercial use
Marilyn J. Tellez, M.A.
Certified Job & Career Transition Coach
Email: doitnow@nwinfo.net
Web: www.doitnowcareers.info

Ten tips for starting a new job

Ten Tips For Starting A New Job1.Get to know people. First meet those people in your … and then those in … you … with. Listen more than you talk. Ask lots of … and g

Ten Tips For Starting A New Job

1.Get to know people. First meet those people in your department and then those in departments you interface with. Listen more than you talk. Ask lots of questions and get clarification if necessary so you truly understand how the office/department/business works.

2.Don’t try to change everything at once. Be open to learning “their” way before you suggest “your” way.

3.Get in synch with your bosses priorities. What are his/her expectations of you? Make sure you are living up to them.

4.Have lunch with different people in the organization. Learn the “unwritten rules” of your new workplace.

5.Learn about the culture. Seek out those people who have been there a long time and schedule time to talk with them.

6.Get to know the key players. Seek out people both inside and outside your area who have roles that are critical to your team’s success. Ask for their support and offer yours to them.

7.Identify the critical challenges. Develop a plan that shows the way you will address your most critical challenges and the time frames that you expect completion. Share this with your boss.

8.Complete a project. Select at least one visible project to be completed within your first 60 days in the job.

9.Take care of yourself. Create a schedule for yourself that includes time off and good self-care. Changing jobs is stressful so include activities that you know reduce stress for you i.e. proper rest, exercise, good diet, family time etc.

10.Celebrate your success! Feel good about what you have accomplished. Confidence is an important part of your success in your job

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alvah Parker is a Business and Career Coach as well as publisher of Parker’s Points, an email tip list and Road to Success, an ezine. Alvah is found on the web at www.asparker.com. She may also be reached at 781-598-0388.
Copyright © 2004 all rights reserved. Permission is granted to reproduce in its entirety including copyright and contact information.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alvah Parker is a Business and Career Coach as well as publisher of Parker’s Points, an email tip list and Road to Success, an ezine. Alvah is found on the web at www.asparker.com. She may also be reached at 781-598-0388.
Copyright © 2004 all rights reserved. Permission is granted to reproduce in its entirety including copyright and contact information.

Knowing your unique gifts

When Bill became my client he had a very … … business but he could see the business … was … He felt that he was not using his natural gifts … in his busin

When Bill became my client he had a very successful recruiting business but he could see the business environment was changing. He felt that he was not using his natural gifts effectively in his business and he wanted some help in identifying what he could do with those talents that would provide him with more fulfilling work.

The one characteristic that separates the ordinary worker from the extraordinary one is that the great ones know themselves very well and use their special talents to make the work better for themselves and others. Bill was on the right track. He wanted to uncover what he was naturally good at and then find a way to use those gifts in his work.

Why is it that we tend to focus on improving our weaknesses instead of looking for our strengths and using them to our advantage? What I am suggesting is that if you work at getting better at something, work on what you are good at (It’s usually what you like to do too!) and forget about working on improving what you have no desire to be an expert in.

In Bill’s recruiting business he needed to have excellent phone skills since most of his work was done by phone. But Bill knew he needed the excitement he got from being face to face with people. If he had stayed in his recruiting business he might have taken courses on telephone sales techniques… not something that excited him.

We get a lot of “guidance” encouraging us to perfect our weakest skills. From our first days in school our teachers are critical of anything less than perfection in reading, spelling and arithmetic. That carries over to our adulthood when that inner voice continues to tell us to “do it until you get it right” even though it is a struggle.

We all however have skills that we do easily. Great leaders, entrepreneurs and managers know themselves well enough to know what those skills are and use them in their jobs. According to Kenneth Tucker in an article for the Gallup Management Journal, “The best managers succeed because they have an acute awareness of their own talents, they understand how to use those talents intentionally to motivate and develop their direct reports, and they maximize others’ performance by helping them identify their greatest talents and turn them into strengths.”

In her book, Use What You’ve Got and Other Business Lessons I learned from My Mom Barbara Corcoran, Founder of the real estate company, The Corcoran Group, says her mother told her, “If you don’t have big breasts, put ribbons on your pigtails.” She says, “I didn’t have a big chest but I did have a nice personality, a great smile and the gift of gab. All I needed was my mother’s cue to begin using them to my advantage. That was my first lesson in sales.”

According to the Kenneth Tucker article, “Most people are unaware of their talents.” Are you aware of yours? Some managers are really good at identifying the strengths and talents of employees. You are lucky if you work for one.

If you work alone or have a manager who can’t help youFree Articles, here are a few ways to identify your talents. Ask four or five friends or co-workers what they see as your talents. You’ll get some common themes as you review their answers. Another approach can be done in a group. Each member is given a blank piece of paper that someone tapes to that member’s back. Participants are instructed to write some positive characteristics of that person on the member’s paper. Everyone ends up with a list of their positive traits.

Another group that I was part of took the time at one meeting to collectively verbalize and write down the strengths and talents for each member. As you use one or all of these methods begin to think about what is said and sit with it a bit. Eventually you will know what fits you.

Often people use assessments to learn about themselves. http://www.emode.com is a website with lots of different tests. If you like assessments you’ll love this site. One that might help you to identify your talents is called the “True Talent Test”. Use caution when reading the results of any assessment. You are the best judge as to whether the assessment is accurate or not. None is 100% accurate so accept what you agree with and disregard what seems wrong.

Finally another way people learn how to identify and work with their talents is to hire a coach. A coach can give you the support you need to try some different ways to identify your gifts and/or sort out all the input you get from trying the other identification methods.

After doing several of these exercises my client Bill actually decided to try working for a radio station both in their marketing department and on air. Here he could easily use his gift of being a natural marketer. It turned out to be the kind of work he really loved.

Take Action:

1. Try any or all of the methods I suggested to find your gifts. If you already know them think about how you are using them in your current job. Can you find other ways to use them in your work and in your life?

2. Read Use What You’ve Got and Other Business Lessons I learned from My Mom by Barbara Corcoran. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1591840023/parkerassociates/002-5392280-0261609 One of 10 children Barbara’s mother was able to identify each child’s unique talent. Barbara says she chose to believe her mother that her gift was creativity and went on to use that gift in her real estate business.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alvah Parker is a Business and Career Coach as well as publisher of Parker’s Points, an email tip list and Road to Success, an ezine. Alvah is found on the web at www.asparker.com. She may also be reached at 781-598-0388.
Copyright © 2004 all rights reserved. Permission is granted to reproduce in its entirety including copyright and contact information.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alvah Parker is a Business and Career Coach as well as publisher of Parker’s Points, an email tip list and Road to Success, an ezine. Alvah is found on the web at www.asparker.com. She may also be reached at 781-598-0388.
Copyright © 2004 all rights reserved. Permission is granted to reproduce in its entirety including copyright and contact information.

Could you be a workaholic

Could You Be A … David … you need to put on boots and grab a lap-top computer to relieve yourself at night, you might be a redneck … never crossed my mind that there

Could You Be A Workaholic?
By David Leonhardt

If you need to put on boots and grab a lap-top computer to relieve yourself at night, you might be a redneck workaholic.

It never crossed my mind that there could be such a thing as a redneck workaholic, until I read a column on “Are you a workaholic?”

“Did you read this?” I asked my wife. “Are you a workaholic? It looks just like those you-might-be-a-redneck jokes.”

My wife studied the page. “Maybe it was written by a redneck alcoholic.” She suggested.

“Workaholic, not alcoholic.”

“How do you know the writer is not an alcoholic?” she demanded.

“I don’t. But the column is about workaholics, and it reads just like a series of redneck jokes.”

“Well, maybe it was written by a redneck workaholic, then.” She suggested.

“No way. There is no such a thing.”

“Why not?” she wanted to know.

“Because workaholics sit late in front of computer screens and steroid-laced in-boxes, wearing $500 suits and $550 haircuts. Folks out here wear $19.95 jeans and occasionally wash their hair.”

“But many of them do spend late hours in front of their computers,” my wife pointed out.

“Like who?”

“Like you.”

“Oh, yeah…”

“Being a workaholic is not just about computers and offices and taking out a mortgage for a haircut,” she added. “Look at Buster.”

“Buster?”

“Sure, every time he’s set to retire, he goes and buys another machine,” she pointed out. “One year it was a backhoe. Another it was a dump truck.”

“Wow, he must be desperate this year.”

“Why?” my wife asked.

“Because this year he bought a whole combine…”

“Ooh, that does sound desperate.”

“…plus a farm to use it on!”

“See?” my wife smiled. “You don’t have to live in the city to be a workaholic. There can be such a thing as a workaholic redneck.

“That’s a pity. Being a workaholic means missing out on a lot of life.”

“That’s true, but it’s not just city folk who miss their kids growing up or are too busy working to help their wives clean the dishes.”

I took the hint and picked up a drying cloth. “You mean that anyone can get caught up in work, and lose sight of what’s really important? Even farmers, moat diggers and the guy who sorts through the trash at the dump looking for the tastiest morsels to throw to the gulls?”

“I suppose so,” she answered with that what-have-you-been-smoking look on her face. “Why not try to see if workaholic redneck jokes work?”

“Well, if you look forward to Christmas this year, because you might take the afternoon off from tilling the land, you might be a workaholic redneck.”

“That’s the spirit,” she encouraged.

I tried another, “If you’re drinking your morning coffee from a dirty mason jar from yesterday, you might be a workaholic redneck.”

“Very good,” she praised.

“If you stick family pictures to your backhoe window to remind you what they look like, you might be a workaholic redneck.”

“Why not try one more, just to make sure?” my wife suggested.

“OK, if you bring your work with you to your son’s baseball game, you might be a workaholic redneck.”

“Uh, OK…” she began.

“And if nobody complains about the smell, you might live in a town full of workaholic rednecks!”

“You got it!” she shouted.

I realized that I had spent way too much time talking about workaholic redneck jokes. There was only one thing I could do to compensate.

I tossed aside the drying clothFeature Articles, grabbed my lap-top computer and rushed to the outhouse to catch up on a few hundred urgent emails.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Leonhardt is a humor columnist
http://www.thehappyguy.com/positive-thinking-free-ezine.html
He is author of Climb Your Stairway to Heaven
http://www.iuniverse.com/bookstore/book_detail.asp?isbn=0-595-17826-X
Read more personal growth articles:
http://www.thehappyguy.com/self-actualization-articles.html
Visit his liquid vitamins store:
http://www.vitamin-supplements-store.net










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Leonhardt is a humor columnist
http://www.thehappyguy.com/positive-thinking-free-ezine.html
He is author of Climb Your Stairway to Heaven
http://www.iuniverse.com/bookstore/book_detail.asp?isbn=0-595-17826-X
Read more personal growth articles:
http://www.thehappyguy.com/self-actualization-articles.html
Visit his liquid vitamins store:
http://www.vitamin-supplements-store.net

The job loss myth

… … John Kerry is fond of stating that “… not since Herbert Hoover has any … lost more jobs than George W. Bush.” And there is a kernel of truth to the … thanks t

Presidential candidate John Kerry is fond of stating that “… not since Herbert Hoover has any president lost more jobs than George W. Bush.” And there is a kernel of truth to the statement; thanks to technology, jobs require less human intervention to complete. However, a larger factor in this seeming loss of employment is due to the evolution of the American workforce from a lot indentured to the confines of one company or one job title toward the Jeffersonian ideal of every person being a free agent, or indie.

The explosion in the number of people going indie has a number of causes. Downsizing created the realization that “job security” isn’t something other people provide, but something you have to create. Two-income families discovered that with their increased tax burden and overhead expenses for daycare, cleaning, housekeeping services, home maintenance and lawn care, a second income from paid full-time employment can actually be a liability. Individuals interested in becoming self-employed can segue more easily from employee to entrepreneur via the indie route. Finally, career changers can obtain valuable experience and networking opportunities in their field of choice with contract work.

Indies may lose company-provided benefits, but that doesn’t mean they are without means. As an independent contractor, they are eligible to create Medical Savings Accounts, or they may be eligible to participate in a group health plan through organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce. They can create their own retirement programs via SEP, SIMPLE, or IRA investments, or the direct purchase of government-backed I-bonds. If they work out of their homes, they have access to extensive tax deductions not available to wage earners.

What kind of jobs are available to independent contractors? Well, here are some of the indie jobs I’ve done:
1)Telephone psychic ($20.00 per hour, work from home)
2)Mystery shopper ($15.00 per hour + expenses)
3)Virtual assistant ($15.00 – $30.00 per hour, depending on the task)
4)Editor ($35.00 per hour)
5)Ghostwriter ($50.00 per hour)

Many creative and professional jobs, such as technical writers, webmasters, graphic designers, programmers, teachers and tutors, etc. are done by independent contractors on a project-by-project basis. However, the FedEx Home Delivery and Schwann’s Ice Cream drivers are also independent contractors, so not having professional credentials is not necessarily a barrier to indie work.

Not everyone is suited to life as an indie. If you absolutely need the structure imposed by a job, a manager and a time clock in order to function, then don’t consider going indie. If, however, you like having some freedom, are self-disciplined enough to complete jobs on time without being told, and can organize your day and yourself to maximize your productivity and meet your clients’ needs, you have the necessary personality traits to become a successful independent contractor.

Ignore the gloom and doom scenario painted by politicians eager to have a job with perks you pay for. Join the indie revolutionPsychology Articles, and gain an income – and a life – without a traditional job. It’s a choice you won’t want the government to “help” you out of.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jean Fritz indies in the areas of copywriting, editing and graphic design. She can be reached via e-mail or through her website, JMT Publications http://jmtpubs.tripod.com).










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jean Fritz indies in the areas of copywriting, editing and graphic design. She can be reached via e-mail or through her website, JMT Publications http://jmtpubs.tripod.com).

Five steps to vocational passion a disciplined plan for major midlife changes

There’s a famous song lyric that asks: “Is that all there is?” Every seven seconds, an American turns 50 years old. So there’s a good chance that song is running through some of their heads. The ques

There’s a famous song lyric that asks: “Is that all there is?” Every seven seconds, an American turns 50 years old. So there’s a good chance that song is running through some of their heads.

The question captures the ennui that many people feel in mid-life. They look up at the clock, see it ticking, and begin counting in their heads all the mountains not climbed, the poems not written, and the songs not sung.

It’s time to stop asking the question idly. I’m offering five initial steps that you can take to evaluate your situation and to begin the transition away from a meaningless grind toward a new life that provides you with energy and fulfillment.

Vocational passion is an alignment of your abilities and interests in a role that gives you unlimited energy and happiness. This is not an overnight process. But it’s a process you can begin today.

Step One: Evaluate

Lots of people settle for jobs that pay the bills but leave them feeling empty. If you want to break out of this trap and find another kind of life, you need to evaluate where you’d like to go.

Examine where your passions lie. On a scale of 1-10, where are you when it comes to vocational passion? A “1” is a living drudgery where you force yourself to your desk every morning and dream about the end of the day; a “10” is a perfect alignment between interests and livelihood.

Too many of us are closer to “1” than “10”. Anything lower than a “5” suggests your working life may be feeding your family, but at the expense of starving your soul.

Step Two: Envision Your Future

You may have seen the U.S. Navy ad that asks: “If someone wrote a book about your life, would anyone want to read it?”

Here’s your chance to write that book – or at least the outline. Sit down and write a short biography that describes who you are five years from now. Describe exactly the life you wish to lead, doing work that you love. You will know you’re done with the exercise when your heart races with excitement.

Then imagine and write down your vision of a perfect vocational day. It’s difficult to achieve something that you have not clearly envisioned. Make sure your vision has clarity. Then document it and pull it out regularly, to refresh your desire to achieve that vision.

Step Three: Tune Out Negative Feedback

Understand this: The moment you announce plans to make a radical change in your life, many people will find the move threatening and they will not wish you well. They will try to talk you out of it and tell you what a big mistake you’re about to make.

Never let the naysayers dictate your life. People who listen to negative voices end up with the status quo.

Step Four: Shore Up Your Support Network

Anyone making a change needs supportive friends, and lots of them.

I suggest a three-tiered model for analyzing your personal support network. The three tiers will include people who are 1) “interested” in your work; 2) “supporters” who are not only interested, but offer creative ideas to move you forward; 3) “believers,” which includes your most active supporters.

Make your lists now. Examine whom you have in your support network and rank them according to these tiers. Focus on networking with your tier-one supporters, while trying to move those people in tiers two and three up the ladder.

Step Five: Assess Your Risk

When taking action to follow one’s passion, people trying to change their life fall into one of four categories. Each requires a different strategy.

Category One: Plenty of money and plenty of time. People in this category have a high tolerance for risk based on their relatively young age and solid financial means.

Category Two: Plenty of money and little time. Because of failing health and/or advancing age, those in category two have some risk tolerance. But they probably lack a solid support network, since most friends will advise against change because they are “too old” or “too sick.”

Category Three: Little time and little money. I define “little money” as having less than six months of cash flow in the bank. Risk tolerance is low in this category, and supporters are probably hard to come by. Most people are in this category.

Category Four: No money and no time. I define “no money” as less then three months cash flow in the bank. Anyone is this position will have a very low risk tolerance. They will find little support to help them move toward doing what they love.

What to do?

Take the calculated risks now.
Make solid but flexible plans
Get aligned around your abilities and interests
Get more education if necessary
Talk to people who do what you want to do!

What’s the worst that can happen?

Remember this: You won’t die or become homeless if you pursue what you love. You may, however, find that your relationship to your money will change. You’ll respect money more, and you’ll find that you can manage on less of it.

Also understand that pursuing vocational passion doesn’t always mean making less money. But it does mean that money is not the only consideration – or even the most important consideration – in choosing your new vocational path.

If you don’t act to pursue your vocational passion, then every seven seconds someone else will come along and ask themselves: “Is that all there is?” Many of them will answer, “NoFree Reprint Articles,” and will do something about it. You can be one of the doers.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Craig Nathanson, The Vocational Coach, is the author of “P Is For Perfect: Your Perfect Vocational Day,” by Book Coach Press. He publishes the free monthly e-zine, “Vocational Passion in Mid-life.” Craig believes the world works a little better when we do the work we love. He helps those in mid-life carry this out. Visit his online community at http://www.thevocationalcoach.com.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Craig Nathanson, The Vocational Coach, is the author of “P Is For Perfect: Your Perfect Vocational Day,” by Book Coach Press. He publishes the free monthly e-zine, “Vocational Passion in Mid-life.” Craig believes the world works a little better when we do the work we love. He helps those in mid-life carry this out. Visit his online community at http://www.thevocationalcoach.com.

Four steps a recruiter takes to trash cvs and resumes

Having 200-300 CVs or resumes to analyse, a tight … and probably working late, an … or … … approach is to scan the huge pile quickly and look for any little reason to

Having 200-300 CVs or resumes to analyse, a tight schedule, and probably working late, an employer’s or recruiting manager’s approach is to scan the huge pile quickly and look for any little reason to trash your CV or resume. Learn how to avoid your CV or resume being trashed and how to almost guarantee that it gets noticed and shortlisted.

The scenario described above of a recruiting manager or employer is fairly typical. With hundreds of CVs or resumes, little time, and the pressure of identifying the best person for the job, the strategy a recruiter takes is to first eliminate all those who show any little sign of being worthy of elimination. And the basis of that is your CV and resume, highlighting the great importance attached to this one or two page document.

So what happens when the pile of 300 CVs and resumes are put in front of the recruitment manager? Well there are three main steps, which are taken to filter the pile. Filtering is needed to choose appropriate candidates for the interview stage. So those not worthy of being interviewed have their CVs or resumes trashed. Let’s take a look at them one by one.

The first stage: The 5-10 second glance

The recruitment manager is not going to spend minutes going through each CV or resume to find what he is looking for. Rather, his first step is to spend at the most 10 seconds to take a quick glance at mainly the first page and the following page(s) if the first page interests him. So the process of elimination begins with the following:

* Any CV or resume which is longer than 4 pages will be trashed. This is generally the case, unless the employer requires a detailed career history. But most CVs are no longer than three pages, and as for resumes they should be shorter. So the recruitment manager will not be bothered reading anything over 4 pages.

* Any CV or resume that does not have a profile, or objective or similar paragraph and an easy discernible list of skills on the front page will get trashed. The recruitment manager does not want to start scanning your CV or resume to see if he can find where your skills and achievements are, or what you are qualified to do. You are supposed to present that to the recruitment manager using your career marketing tool, the CV or resume.

* Any CV or resume which is written in long sentences and lengthy paragraphs and where a quick glance does not allow the identification of relevant information, such as skills and achievements will get trashed. The recruitment manager is not there to read essays or novels.

* Any CV or resume which is annoying. This is mainly due to bad formatting. Things such as using many different fonts and font sizes, cluttering the information with little white space, making it harder to read. Also the use of excessive underlining, bold and italics, in combination. All of these matters make the CV or resume difficult to read and follow and annoys the recruitment manager.

By now the recruitment manager has gladly trashed 70% of all the pile and is left with around 80-90 CVs or resumes. Happy with the time he has saved, he or she can now spend a little more quality time scanning what remains.

The second stage: 10-15 second glance at the first page

At this point, the recruitment manager is looking for what is specifically relevant. This requires a match between the skills required for the job and the skills and achievements presented by you. So without really looking at your or CV or resume in too much detail, he simply wants to identify what have you got to offer and does it match his or her organisation’s requirements. He or she will be looking to identify this on the first page and without having to try hard to locate this information. The match could be general or it could be specific. But because the recruitment manager is only interested in a general match, spending a relatively small amount of time (10-15 seconds) in gauging this, he will include CVs or resumes at this stage which will still be filtered later. By now there around 40 CVs or resumes that remain, about half from the first stage of filtering.

The third stage: Short listing for the interview stage

Here the recruitment manager spends a little more time, and picks out those CVs and resumes that have a specific match, or a very close match to the job requirements, and these are considered potential candidates. Here, the method of the recruitment manager has changed from elimination of irrelevant CVs and resumes to picking out highly relevant and quality matches. So after this stage, about two-thirds of the remaining pile will be discarded and we have around 15 CVs or resumes that remain.

The fourth stage: Picking candidates from the short list

It is only at this point that the recruitment manager will now look in more detail and go beyond the first page of the CV or resume to pick candidates from the short list. There are a number of factors that the recruitment manager will be focusing upon:

* Is the candidate’s latest work experience related to the job being offered

* Does the candidate have a strong academic background

* What type of companies has the candidate worked for

* What achievements has the candidate demonstrated from previous jobs

* What non-technical and job-specific skills does the candidate possess

After looking at these factors, the final interview list will be prepared which can be less than 5 candidates. So, have you got a CV or resume that will survive these four steps? The reality of the recruitment process shows that you need a targeted and focused CV or resume that not only grabs attention by showing a skills match, but is also craftedFind Article, worded and formatted to give you an edge over other candidates.

Article Tags:
Four Steps, Recruiter Takes, Recruitment Manager, First Page, Resume Which

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Amjad Rafiq is a careers consultant who has provided online solutions for International recruitment agencies. He is also the developer of http://www.mycvbuilder.com which is an online CV building service that combines all the various elements to creating winning CVs and resumes.










Article Tags:
Four Steps, Recruiter Takes, Recruitment Manager, First Page, Resume Which

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Amjad Rafiq is a careers consultant who has provided online solutions for International recruitment agencies. He is also the developer of http://www.mycvbuilder.com which is an online CV building service that combines all the various elements to creating winning CVs and resumes.

How to choose your ideal career

They say that most people do complete and total career changes at least once often twice in their … Very few people chose the ideal perfect career for … when they’re in high school a

They say that most people do complete and total career changes at least once often twice in their lifetimes. Very few people chose the ideal perfect career for themselves when they’re in high school and blissfully happily work those same jobs for the rest of their lives. With the way that technology and everything else changes so fast, I think it’s ridiculous to expect to stay in one job from the time you leave school until you retire. Even staying in the same company can be a huge challenge. So how will you pick your first career? Your next major career change?

The first thing I want you to look at is what kinds of things do you enjoy doing and what you are naturally good at. Imagine that you just won the lottery and you will never have to work again for another day of your life. How would you spend your time? After the shopping sprees and traveling and such grows old, you’re going to have to fill your days up doing something so that you aren’t bored out of your mind. What would you do? What would consume your attention if you could freely bury yourself in it? Is there a way to make a living at that now? Is there a way to incorporate some of that into your current career? Could you begin doing it now as a hobby and grow it into a second income and eventually quit your ‘real job’ to play full time at your new hobby/career?

You obviously have to look at practicality issues. Truth be known my very favorite thing to do is drive convertibles and suntan at the beach. That’s not likely going to ever become a career and it sure as heck isn’t going to pay my bills! You have to look at what you like to do and take a realistic look at whether the market is ever going to pay you an income for doing it. Just because you love doing something doesn’t mean that the world is going to love giving you money for doing it. There are plenty of musicians and artists out there who can’t earn enough to support themselves. It takes more then just a love of your work. Pick a number of different things that you love and narrow the list down by deciding which ones would realistically finance you at the level that you require.

Another thing to consider, especially when you’re choosing your first job is how much education or special training is required. How many kids think that because they love to play basketball that they’ll be the next Michael Jordan? How many put in the kind of work and practice that he did? If you want to be a doctor, then you better seriously contemplate the years of college and the extremely high cost of going to medical school. Down the road, a lot of the experience you get in one career can be transferred to your next career. Customer service skills that you learn while waiting tables will still serve you later when you’re an entrepreneur. If you have a lot of the skills from previous work experience, but not all of them, then you have to figure out how to finance going to night school or whatever else you need to do to change careers. Additional education and skills shouldn’t stop you from changing to a great job that you know you’ll love, but you do need to take it into serious consideration while making the choice.

Many of the community colleges have these cool placement tests that tell you what kinds of work you’d be happy doing. They ask you a bunch of multiple choice questions like if you’d rather work indoors or outside. Do you want to travel as part of your career or stay home? How much weight are you willing to lift? How introverted or extroverted are you? How much money do you want to make? After you answer these questions and a bunch more, the computer system spits out a list of careers that you would be suited to. Keep in mind that what interested you at twenty isn’t likely to be the same as what interests you at forty. I would think that you could do an online search and find some of those tests online. These will give you some ideas you may have never considered. I remember taking one when I was in my early twenties and I ranked extremely high at “Clergy.” I laughed and thought that was the stupidest thing I’d ever heard of. I wanted to be a motivational speaker and it took me a couple of days before I realized that it’s a very similar job description. Whether I’m telling you about God or I’m telling you how to pull yourself up by your bootstraps, it’s the same skills and many of the same daily tasks. I’m preaching a different topic, but I’m still up on my soapbox telling you what to do and telling you how to live, aren’t I? So be open minded to what the test results show.

So, start out by brainstorming ideas of things that you would love to do if money was not an issue. Then add to it the results of one of those placement tests. Take the ideas from those two exercises and start looking at the practicalities of marketability and how much education and training are necessary. If you can find a way to do what you love and make a living at it, then you’ve got the key ingredients to creating a life of abundance and prosperity that the rest of the world only dreams of. You don’t have to stay with something just because you used to love it and now you make a lot of money doing it. If you are bored and ready for something new, then start dreaming and planning your next adventure.

Copyright 2004, Skye ThomasArticle Search, Tomorrow’s Edge

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Skye Thomas is the CEO of Tomorrow’s Edge, an Internet leader in inspiring leaps of faith. Her books, articles, and astrological forecasts have inspired people of all ages and faiths to recommit themselves to the pursuit of happiness. To read more of her articles and to sign up to receive her free weekly newsletter, go to www.TomorrowsEdge.net. To download free previews of her books, go to www.SkyeThomas.com.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Skye Thomas is the CEO of Tomorrow’s Edge, an Internet leader in inspiring leaps of faith. Her books, articles, and astrological forecasts have inspired people of all ages and faiths to recommit themselves to the pursuit of happiness. To read more of her articles and to sign up to receive her free weekly newsletter, go to www.TomorrowsEdge.net. To download free previews of her books, go to www.SkyeThomas.com.

How to be prepared for a layoff

If you are … that your company might be planning a layoff, your best course of action is to be … … often see warning signs that their jobs may be at risk. Such signs could incl

If you are concerned that your company might be planning a layoff, your best course of action is to be prepared. Employees often see warning signs that their jobs may be at risk. Such signs could include poor company performance, earlier rounds of layoffs, conflicts with their manager, increased manager intervention and involvement, and poor performance reviews. Employees see the signs, but aren’t as proactive as they should be in looking out for their future. Here are steps you can take to be prepared for a layoff.

Update your resume. Start complying a list of your accomplishments in your present job. In particular, focus on quantifiable achievements. Bring home a copy of the position description your human resources department has developed for your job. Use this position description to check the content of your resume. If you need help, get it from the Internet, resume writing books, or a professional resume writer.

Create a portfolio. Make copies of positive letters you have received from customers and letters of recognition you have received from your employer. If you have a job where you create materials that are not company confidential such as brochures or operating manuals, make copies of your work to show to potential employers during future job interviews.

Develop your list of references. Contact the people you would like to use as references to ask their permission to be used as a reference. Obtain their current contact information and type up your reference list.

Check job postings. See what the market need is for someone with your background and experience. Consider applying for jobs now if the market is weak and you feel the probability of being laid off in the near future is high. Also use job postings as a means of checking the content of your resume to see if you omitted key points or focused on items that aren’t being emphasized by employers.

Sign up for a personal e-mail account. Include this personal e-mail address on your resume rather than your business e-mail address. If you lose your job, your business e-mail account will no longer be valid. If you decide to pursue a new job while still employed, use your personal e-mail account to transmit your resume to employers.

Research outplacement services. Outplacement services are career transition services that employers pay for to help you with your job search. To be prepared in case of a layoff, research the services provided by various outplacement firms to determine what would be of most value to you. Would you want an outplacement firm that would write your resume and cover letter for you? Do you value one-on-one time with a career transition consultant? Or are you interested in attending group workshops to learn how to prepare your own marketing materials? If you are laid off, be prepared to negotiate for the outplacement services that you feel will benefit you. The best time to negotiate is when you have the most leverage, prior to signing your separation letter.

Ask for a letter of recommendation. If you are laid off, ask for a letter of recommendation from your former employer. Reach agreement with your employer on this request prior to signing your separation letter.

Negotiate your severance package. If you are downsized, negotiate the terms of the severance package you are offered. Again, the best time to negotiate is when you have the most leverage, prior to signing your separation letter.

By following these tips, you can prepare yourself to recover as quickly as possible should you be laid off.

Copyright 2004 Quest Career ServicesFeature Articles, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ann Hackett is the President of Quest Career Services, LLC (http://www.questcareer.com). Quest Career Services provides outplacement services to clients nationwide, specializing in offering affordable one-on-one outplacement services. To receive via e-mail a brochure summarizing the outplacement packages Quest Career Services provides, send an e-mail to outplacementbrochure@questcareer.com










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ann Hackett is the President of Quest Career Services, LLC (http://www.questcareer.com). Quest Career Services provides outplacement services to clients nationwide, specializing in offering affordable one-on-one outplacement services. To receive via e-mail a brochure summarizing the outplacement packages Quest Career Services provides, send an e-mail to outplacementbrochure@questcareer.com

Page 2 of 599

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén