Month: April 2021 Page 1 of 526

11 things you must know before hiring a copywriter

So you’re considering hiring copywriting help for your nextbrochure, Web site, or marketing project. Congratulations! You should get great results if you hire a pro to do it right.Many business owners…

So you’re considering hiring copywriting help for your next
brochure, Web site, or marketing project. Congratulations! You should
get great results if you hire a pro to do it right.

Many business owners and marketing professionals have valid concerns
about letting an outsider develop their content. After all — it’s
your business, you know it best, and your image is critical. However,
you’re wrapped up in your business every day. A good copywriter
can see your business in a new light, draw out the key benefits of
your products and services, and communicate that excitement to your
clients and prospects.

Working with a writer isn’t a complicated ordeal, however it will
benefit you tremendously to become familiar with how the relationship
typically works and ways to help the process move along smoothly. So,
here are my top 11 tips on how to choose and work with a copywriter:

1. Understand your mission beforehand.

A crucial factor in streamlining the writing process is determining
the principal points you need to communicate — before you bring in a
writer. Who is your target audience? What is your message? What is
unique about your company? In what type of tone do you want to speak
to your reader? What type of response do you ideally want the reader
to make? Having this information agreed upon before you get a writer
involved will save you unnecessary copy revisions and keep your costs
down.

2. Develop a realistic schedule.

Yes, you’ve heard this all your life, but haste makes waste. Avoid
hastily hiring a copywriter and dumping a rush job on her. Not only
will you not have time to thoroughly check her experience and
references, but, no matter how wonderfully talented she is, her first
drafts will not be “fully cooked.” This is because copywriters need
time to let words and ideas simmer.

Most writers will request a few weeks to develop your copy, so set a
realistic schedule to give the creative process ample time. Count on
going through one or two revisions as your writer refines the piece’s
angle and conveys the key benefits of what you’re promoting.

3. Make sure the writer you hire has written for the medium you want.

Let’s say you need someone to re-energize the copy on your Web site.
A freelancer who has only written magazine articles won’t likely
have the skills to create content for a dynamic Web site. She’s
probably not proficient at breaking-up copy into easily digestible
bits, integrating hyperlinks that entice your users to take action,
and keeping your end-user in mind to plan a friendly, easily-
navigable site. She may be able to learn how, but you’ll be paying
for her slow ramp-up speed. Take time instead to find the right
person — it will save you many headaches down the road.

4. Experience within your industry isn’t always necessary.

“So you’ve never written for a _______ company before?” I’veheard
many prospects say. Don’t worry. A writer’s ability to write well for
the medium is more important than her having prior experience in your
industry.

Many writers are true generalists and write just as well for an edgy
new media start-up as they do for a giant hospital network. They’re
very proficient at diving into your business, learning it inside and
out, and churning out great prose to entice your target market. Now
of course, if you’re producing a technically oriented business-to-
business Web site or marketing piece, you may want to hire a writer
with experience in both your project’s medium and your industry. If
you find a good one, hold on tight. You’ve struck gold!

5. Ask for references, and contact them.

All writers can show you samples of well-written material, but how do
you know if they’ll work to understand your communication needs, meet
deadlines, and act professionally in front of clients? Any great
copywriter should have an ample list of references that she can share
with you. Be sure to contact at least two of them, and ask them about
the writer’s weaknesses as well as her strengths.

6. You get what you pay for.

It amazes me how businesspeople will drop thousands of dollars on Web
or print design and hesitate to spend half as much on great copy.
Pictures and design enhance your message, but jeez folks …the writing
IS your message!

Good copywriting does not come cheaply — you’ll find writers
who charge anywhere from $50 – $150 per hour and up. You’ll pay more
for an experienced writer, one with a particular specialty, or one
who’s also a proficient editor. (Many writers are also great editors,
but not all writers are editors, and vice versa.) Some writers will
even arrange for your piece to get a final review by a professional
proofreader. (A very good idea, since there are almost always a few
errors that no one catches until the last minute.)

7. Work on more than a handshake.

True writing pros will give you an agreement they’ve drawn up for
you. However, you’ll occasionally find yourself having to draft
an agreement for the project. This doesn’t have to be complex — a
simple letter of agreement that you both sign should do fine. Be sure
to include the project size, number of revisions included (if
applicable), timetable, and agreed fee (this can be a flat fee or
hourly rate).

And don’t forget to ask about what’s NOT included. For example,many
writers charge extra for in-person meetings, research time, and
weekend or rush work. You should also expect to pay an upfront
retainer. Serious writers charge one-third to one-half of the total
project fee upfront, and many won’t begin your project until they
have the signed agreement and check in hand. And if you have
sensitive or proprietary information, don’t hesitate to have your
writer sign a non-disclosure agreement.

8. Give your writer background info at the start.

I’ve often heard the story of a writer being hired for a large
project, and the first thing she’s asked to do is come in and
interview several principals of the company. After several days of
interviews, the writer is then handed the company’s annual report,
previous brochures, and marketing plan.

If this background info had been given up front, the client could
have saved hours of time and money! At the beginning of your project,
pass on any and all previous brochures or sales kits, direct mail,
Web site URLs, annual reports, research results, or business or
marketing plans.

9. Appoint one person as your “project captain.”

Appoint one person at your company as project captain. If you allow
too many people in your organization to work with the writer
directly, each of them will likely have a different opinion of the
copy and request different edits from your writer. She may be forced
to make many unnecessary revisions, adding time and cost to your
project.

If you need to involve multiple reviewers in the process, have your
project captain handle the internal reviews and edits and decide
which ones supercede others. Then give your writer one master copy
that includes all edits to be made. Also, be sure to involve your
final decision maker early on, be it your CEO or board of directors.
This gives your writer clear direction and avoids costly revisions
down the road.

10. Give constructive criticism.

Although copywriters have egos of steel and are accustomed to
criticism, make yours constructive for best results. “This paragraph
just doesn’t work” isn’t nearly as effective as “What we need to do
here is stress the benefits of the non-skid surface.” Also, tell her
what parts you do like so she can emulate them elsewhere. And of
course, everyone loves to know when they’ve done a good job. If you
like her workArticle Submission, be sure to share that with her.

11. Don’t discount “chemistry.”

You need to feel comfortable with your writer in order to work
effectively together. Take the time to find a great copywriter whom
you truly like and develop a good working relationship together.
You’ll get top-quality work that will help your business thrive. And
you’ll have a skilled and knowledgeable copywriter on call for your
next communications effort.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alexandria Brown is president of AKB Marketing Communications. Her
FREE monthly e-zine gives “how-to” tips on writing compelling copy
for Web sites, brochures, and e-zines. Learn how to attract new
clients and strengthen your customer relationships! Subscribe today
at http://www.akbwriting.com or by e-mailing AKBMarCom-
On@lists.webvalence.com










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alexandria Brown is president of AKB Marketing Communications. Her
FREE monthly e-zine gives “how-to” tips on writing compelling copy
for Web sites, brochures, and e-zines. Learn how to attract new
clients and strengthen your customer relationships! Subscribe today
at http://www.akbwriting.com or by e-mailing AKBMarCom-
On@lists.webvalence.com

Somebodys distributing your copyright content illegally know your facts before you accuse

Is someone distributing your software or other copyrightcontent illegally over the Internet? It’s possible. Ithappens. If you can prove your case, you have groundsfor legal action.BUT — before making…

Is someone distributing your software or other copyright
content illegally over the Internet? It’s possible. It
happens. If you can prove your case, you have grounds
for legal action.

BUT — before making yourself look foolish and creating
enemies, have your facts straight. A reasonable
understanding of Internet technology can prevent you
from ending up with egg on your face.

Take this situation. I’ve changed names to protect the
guilty.

A representative of an online business emailed me
saying, “It has been brought to my attention that
you have made the “something.com” public download
files freely available for download by FTP from your
web site. Would you please let us know immediately
what is going on and what your justification is
for doing this.”

First mistake. If the files are “public download
files”, then what is the problem? Public download
files are freely available.

However, since I had never heard of their
software, I responded with a request that the company
rep show me the link or at least provide a
screen capture of the alleged FTP activity.

I received an apologetic email from the company
rep saying that she could not locate a link to her
software from my site. “Perhaps your site has been
confused with someone else’s,” she explained. Second
mistake. If you’re making an allegation of this nature,
know where the problem can be found and be ready
to present evidence to the other party. You look more
than a little incompetent if you can’t back up your
claim in the most elementary way.

A few hours later, a third email arrived. This time,
the company rep accused me of being untruthful
and threatened legal action. She then
backed up her case with the following URL:

ftp://www.nightcats.com/pub/users heirfiles/

Third mistake.

Sure enough, “theirfiles” were available for
download at this link. And, sure enough,
www.nightcats.com is my site domain. HOWEVER,
had the company rep had a basic understanding of FTP
(File Transfer Protocol), she would have understood
that a “pub” directory is “public” — and therefore the
URL had nothing to do with my site.

A phone call to my web host confirmed they were hosting
both my site and the other company’s site. Since both web
sites were on the same public server, any domain listed on
that server would have produced identical results with the
FTP URL given above. That is, you could change
ftp://www.nightcats.com/pub/users heirfiles/ to
ftp://www.something-else.com/pub/users heirfiles/
and you would get access to this company’s software. If
a web administrator has set up the server to implement
anonymous FTP in this fashion, then all that is necessary
is for both web domains to be stored on the same server.

And that brings us to the fourth mistake. If you don’t want
your copyright-protected software files to be available for
public download, why in the wide world would you store
them in a public FTP directory where everyone has free
access? Public means public. If you want the files to be
available only to authorized users, doesn’t it make sense
to have a private, password-protected directory set up on
your web site?

Had I wanted to be vindictive, I could have posted the URL
to multiple newsgroups and mailing lists. Hundreds of
people could have downloaded those files before the
problem was corrected. I didn’t do that, but some
people would.

What can be learned from this episode?
1. An understanding of basic Internet protocols is
essential if you are running an Internet business. It is
equally important that your agents, employees and
company reps are trained, since they are the ones
that are likely to make the mistakes.
2. Have a tech-guro available to advise you on
issues that are beyond your current understanding.
3. If you’re operating an Internet businessFree Web Content, get a tough skin.
You’ll be accused of some mighty interesting stuff.

Article Tags:
Public Downloadfiles

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

June Campbell’s writing has appeared in various international
publications.
Visit her on the web for articles, a FREE gift, or for how-to
booklets on writing a business proposal, developing a business
plan, developing a joint venture contract and more
http://www.nightcats.com










Article Tags:
Public Downloadfiles

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

June Campbell’s writing has appeared in various international
publications.
Visit her on the web for articles, a FREE gift, or for how-to
booklets on writing a business proposal, developing a business
plan, developing a joint venture contract and more
http://www.nightcats.com

Things you might like to know about copyrights

You may be under the false … that before you can get your text … you must “get the … to your … … You might also think that in order to get the … yo

You may be under the false impression that before you can get your
text published, you must “get the copyright” to your own
written
material. You might also think that in order to get the copyright,
you must “apply” for it. This is just not so. In the
following few
paragraphs, I’ll give you some simple facts about copyrights that
may help you in your quest to get published.

First, it is important to understand that you cannot
“copyright” an idea; you can only copyright what you have
written.
That is, you might have just written the greatest self-help manual on
how to breed guppies. And you did, indeed, file for your copyright
with the Library of Congress. Three weeks after completing the formal
copyrighting process, you find out that the manager of your
neighborhood pet store (where you’ve been buying your guppies)
has just sold the TV rights to a new hit show “Breeding
Guppies” and
he is using many of the same principles that you’ve outlined in
your
manual on how to go about guppy breeding.

So, naturally, since this is the 21st Century and you live in
America, you want to sue the guy. You think you have a sure thing,
and you are dreaming of the million-dollar award that the jury is
sure to give you. But…you’d better not put a down payment on
that Guppy Farm in Iowa just yet.

The manual you wrote, the exact words, phrases, sentences,
paragraphs, and chapters that you wrote, belong to you. It is illegal
for anyone to reproduce or use any of that text, in part or in whole,
for profit without your permission. However, you must be able to
prove that your exact words have been stolen before you can get an
award for copyright infringement. So, you know that guy with his hit
TV series? Well, unless he’s reading from your manual
word-for-word,
or attempting to sell your manual as a supplemental text that
he’s
written, then he’s probably doing nothing illegal. He’s just
using
the idea of breeding guppies.

You do “own” the copyright to your text, all its words and
clever phrases. And you don’t even have to file with the Library
of Congress in order to have the copyright on your text. The
copyright is conferred upon you the minute you write your New York
Times Bestseller. All you have to do is be able to prove, beyond any
doubt, the date that you wrote the material. For your protection,
then, it is wise to print and date your material, and establish with
a third party through a written communication that you have just
finished your text. At that time, you can legally affix the copyright
symbol (the letter c inside a circle) to your work.

Now here’s where a formal copyright comes in. By filing with the
Library of Congress (and paying them their required application fee),
you can establish definitively a date of copyright that will stand up
in any court of law. Any judge or jury will defer to your date over
someone else who can merely claim by word of mouth that his text came
before yours. It’s a good idea to formally copyright any text
that you are planning to market. So, if you’re convinced that the
world population-at-large is in desperate need of “Breeding
Guppies,
What Every Ichthyologist Needs to Know” and you plan to sell it on
Ebay for $19.95, you should apply for a formal copyright.

Just having the copyright, however, doesn’t mean that other
people can’t quote your work. They may do so, as long as you are
given full credit for having written it prior to their use. This is
called a “reference” or a “citation” and generally,
whatever passage
is being quoted will appear offset in quotation marks (so that the
reader can visualize which words belong to someone other than the
author of the text in which the quote appears). Of course, at present
the contingent of Copyright Police is not up to tracking down every
single instance of copyright infringement, and chances are that not
everyone cites original authors as scrupulously as they should, so
beware of whom you casually let look at or read your text (or to whom
you give a copy).

Copyrights are not forever. Typically, a copyright lasts for 50 years
past the natural life of the original author. Authors’ heirs may
sometimes re-apply for copyrights, but generally written texts that
are this old are considered “public domain” and may be
reproduced
without paying the author’s family a royalty fee.

In the publishing world, you will find that many publications require
that you relinquish your copyrights to the work in return for having
your work published. This is a fairly standard procedure—unless
your name happens to be Stephen King or Danielle Steele. Once
you’ve
relinquished your copyright to a given work, you can not sell or
submit that text again unless you get express approval from the
publisher that now owns the copyright.

There are sites on the World Wide Web where you can post your work
for others to read or use as they see fit, so-called “free
sites.” In cases such as this, there should be a disclaimer that
anyone who uses or reproduces your work must give you full credit.
Whether this happens all the time is certainly a matter for some
speculation, but your safeguard is that you own the copyright and if
you find that someone is profiting from your work and that you have
not been compensated, you can file a copyright infringement suit
against them.

As of the date of this articleScience Articles, the current copyright fee is $30. All
the instructions and necessary forms can be found on U.S. Copyright
Office’s web site: http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/. I have
copyrighted several texts and advise that you mail your application
with a “Return Receipt Requested” from the U.S. Post Office.
This is your proof that the Copyright Office has received your
copyright application.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jan K., The Proofer is a full-time freelance proofreader and
copyeditor. In business since 1995, she has enjoyed working for a
diverse world-wide clientele, covering subject matter including
academic research, medical law, consumer surveys, and self-help
materials. Please visit http://www.janktheproofer.com for more
information.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jan K., The Proofer is a full-time freelance proofreader and
copyeditor. In business since 1995, she has enjoyed working for a
diverse world-wide clientele, covering subject matter including
academic research, medical law, consumer surveys, and self-help
materials. Please visit http://www.janktheproofer.com for more
information.

Copyrights and wrongs

Somehow we have come to believe more is better, that it‘s a good thing if asearch … up with 27,999 entries on a given subject. Yet it‘s because of thisvery “too … many …

Somehow we have come to believe more is better, that it‘s a good thing if a
search engine
pops up with 27,999 entries on a given subject. Yet it‘s because of this
very “too muchness”
that many journalists have found themselves entangled in the Web.

Writers believe they‘ve sold one-time rights to articles, which then are
left indefinitely on
Websites or in archives – trapped without their permission, often times even
without their
creator’s knowledge. In all but a few cases, writers have not been
compensated financially for
this prolonged use of their work.

These days every tiny business, every magazine and newspaper, wants a
Website. Editors
who would probably hand back the coin to the supermarket cashier who gave
them too much
change apparently think nothing of decorating their Webpages with “donated”
articles.

Copyright is copyright, folks, be it bleached pulp or cyberspace. Cyberspace
is just more
complex.

The Internet is like a train out of control, running away with writers
rights. Because the Web
is in its infancy, these working conditions can be improved. We still have a
chance to patch
things up and head that train in the right direction.

Discovering a freshness
Even some journalists who once turned up their noses at the new medium are
curious enough
to flag down the train, not even sure where it‘s bound. The Internet has
been said to provide
some old-fashioned print journalists the rush of excitement they once felt
when they started
out as cub reporters so many moons ago.

There‘s plenty of uncharted territory to cover and new rules to learn such
as creating shorter
sentences and paragraphs. This can lend a certain freshness to a stale
career.

Web managers do have a problem on their hands. Practically overnight, they
have been
expected to become HTML savvy and produce fully-functioning, competitive
sites with
plenty of toots and whistles.

Often they have little or no staff. They are supposed to intelligently
address an international audience, wow them, and somehome make a profit at
the end.

To disguise the function of journalists by referring to them as “content
providers,” “word
architects” or mere “slot fillers” is a disservice. With the new titles, it
‘s easier to imagine
them mindlessly churning out piece after piece to hand over without comment
or concern.
Instead of sitting in first class, “content providers” end up chasing after
the caboose.

Let‘s explore and celebrate this new medium together, but there‘s no passing
the buck. Let‘s
not allow the practice of fair compensation for good journalism to be
thoughtlessly tossed out
the train‘s window as we sit back and enjoy the ride.

We editors and publishers are the ones with the authority to make positive
changes and we certainly have the responsibility to know exactly what‘s
posted on our Websites, under what conditions it got thereFind Article, where it goes
next – and why.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Roberta Beach Jacobson lives on the tiny Greek island of
Karpathos and is the editor of Kafenio (http://www.kafeniocom.com), the free
monthly e-zine focusing on European life and culture.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Roberta Beach Jacobson lives on the tiny Greek island of
Karpathos and is the editor of Kafenio (http://www.kafeniocom.com), the free
monthly e-zine focusing on European life and culture.

Protecting your online real estate

Now that you have an active website and ezine, you should … about … it! Let’s face it, your … wide open to anyone with an itchy right clicking … an Internet connecti

Now that you have an active website and ezine, you should be
concerned about protecting it! Let’s face it, your website
is wide open to anyone with an itchy right clicking finger
and an Internet connection.

Protecting your intellectual property and website content
is not as difficult as most people think. I imagine you
put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into your website’s
planning, concept, and creation. Correct? Why not take an
extra couple of hours to protect it from all the Internet
slime that’s waiting around the corner to steal it?

Your first step in your security checklist should be a trip
to “10 Big Myths About Copyright Explained.” You may find
many of your questions answered here.
http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html

Once you get the feel for the kind of protection that’s
readily available to you, it’s time to get serious!

All the copyright, patent and trademark information you need
can be found through the following resources.

Congressional Web Site
http:/ homas.loc.gov/home homas2.html
http://www.uspto.gov

Copyright & Fair Use at the Stanford University
Libraries http://fairuse.stanford.edu/

Also be sure to visit the World Intellectual Property
Organization at: http://www.wipo.int

Copyright Office
http://www.loc.gov
http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright

Here is another excellent website on copyrights. I am sure
you can dig up trademark and patent info here as well as a
ton of other free advice. The name suits the site well:
http://freeadvice.com/law/570us.htm

Here is a popular patent search system
http://sunsite.unc.edu/patents/intropat.html

You can also contact General Information Services and
request the Information Dissemination Organization’s US
Patent and Trademark Catalog (ask for it by name). This
is a free catalog and contains detailed information on all
aspects of copyright protection. 1-800-786-9199

You can request trademark and patent sales information
from 1-800-972-6382
ptcs@uspto.gov

Take time out today and see what is available to you. Why
wait until you are a victim? Take the time to research the
above resources. Many people do not realize that the
copyright registration fee is only $20. Keep in mind that
federal trademark and patent registration fees are much
higher, but a copyright may be all that you require to
securely document your work.

Federal trademarks can be very expensive, but in some states –
Tennessee, for instance – you can register your trademark
with the state for as little as $5. This protects you from others
within your state stealing your information, and should be
done even for company names, logos, slogans, etc. Contact your
Secretary of State’s office in your state capitol for more
information.

The US Patent and Trademark Office placed its trademark database
online. Now you can search the database directly at.
Do you know how expensive a patent search can be?
Do it here free: http://www.uspto.gov mdb/

I stress to you once again – DO NOT PUT IT OFF. The longer
you waitPsychology Articles, the less likely you will be to bother doing it at
all. Your copyright registration will be good for many years
and only takes a little time to complete.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Seitz – CEO Virtual Imagination Inc.
Published by: Virtual Imagination Inc.
Brought to you by The Helping Hand Internet Marketing
Newsletter. http://www.helpinghand-newsletter.com grab your
free subscription now: mailto:subscribe@associatesearch.com










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Seitz – CEO Virtual Imagination Inc.
Published by: Virtual Imagination Inc.
Brought to you by The Helping Hand Internet Marketing
Newsletter. http://www.helpinghand-newsletter.com grab your
free subscription now: mailto:subscribe@associatesearch.com

Copywriting techniques for a great body

1) Think about your Readers When writing ad copy be sure that the average reader can … and relate to it. Put yourself in their place. Would … Would you say, “That’s me”? On

1) Think about your Readers

When writing ad copy be sure that the average reader can easily
understand and relate to it. Put yourself in their place. Would you
understand? Would you say, “That’s me”? One way to help you write for your
readers, is to write just as if you were saying it to their face. Address
the reader as “you” in your copy. Just like a one on one conversation.
Sometime take a closer look at some of the advertising around you. How many
times do you see them using “you”?

Make your copy interesting to read, almost story-like, all the time
generating enthusiasm for your product or service. Find ways to place facts
in your copy without sounding like an Army Service Manual. The trick is to
convey the hard dry facts and numbers, while making them interesting to
read.

Don’t talk about yourself. Readers don’t care what you like, what you
did or what you think. They want to know if they will like it and how it
will benefit them.

2) Organize your Copy

When you write your copy you should always know what your primary
message or selling point is as well as all the secondary selling points. You
might want to use your primary message as part of your headline and then
dedicate a few lines or paragraph to expand on it. Then fit in your
secondary selling points in lines or paragraphs after that. Whether they are
a few lines or a paragraph would depend on the size of your copy. How much
space you can set aside for your selling points? Before you start writing
your copy write down all your selling points. Sort them in the order of
importance. When writing your copy, move smoothly from point to point, one
leading into the next.

3) Short is Better

Everyone knows that short sentences are easier to read and comprehend
than long sentences. One thing that all writers have in common is that they
are taught to write short and to-the-point sentences. Read back through your
copy. If you find a sentence that has more then 12 words, find a way to
break it down. Break all long sentences into 2 sentences. If necessary,
break them down again. You can also use hyphens to help separate long
sentences. This is not to say that all your sentences should be the same
length. Copy can become boring when the sentences are all the same length.
Vary their length. Just keep them under 12 words. Remember you are writing
copy, not fiction. Sentence fragments, as long as they sound good to the
readers ear, are completely acceptable in copywriting.

4) Don’t be a Dictionary

Use simple and easy words. That’s what a reader understands. Consider
the mindset that you are communicating with. This reader is not trying to
dissect and devour your copy. This is someone, who for one reason or another
has been distracted from their primary goal to read what you have to say.
It’s only a short pause they’re taking to quickly read your words. If you
use complex words, you will either annoy or completely lose your reader.
Keep It Simple Stupid! Ad Copy is Communication. Don’t think that you are
impressing them with words they probably couldn’t spell and would never use
themselves. Make it easy for the reader to understand and keep up with the
copy.

5) Keep Clear of Tech-Terms with Wide Audiences

If your copy is to be read by a wide audience, don’t wrongfully assume
that they will know what you know. If you feel that these facts must be
used, find a way to convey these terms in the best way that they can be
understood. Don’t use a technical term unless it is the best choice.
Sometimes you have no other route than to use technical terms. Lets use
“software” as an example. What other way can you put it? It’s software. But
then again you wouldn’t want to say “C++ Software” just Software. The
average reader has no idea that C++ is a programming language and could care
even less.

6) Clear & Concise

Keep your ad copy free of clutter. Don’t use words that aren’t needed.
You are wasting your readers’ time, weakening your sales message and taking
up valuable space that could be better served in your interest. Your readers
‘ attention span is short and they are usually in a hurry. Avoid
redundancies, over-worded phrases and other poor writing mistakes that serve
no other function than taking up space. Provide specific and concrete
information in a clear and straightforward manner. The more specific you are
the less chance your readers have of misunderstanding you.

7) For God’s Sake, Get to the Point

Be direct and to the point. There is not time for beating around the
bush or to keep your reader guessing.

Next to the headline, the first paragraph of your ad copy is the most
important text in your work. The first paragraph, better known as the “Lead”
paragraph, is what draws in the reader. If your lead paragraph is
uninteresting to the reader, they will surely move on. Move right into your
primary selling point. Don’t waste time with introductions and explanations.
If you must use them, use them later. Your ad copy should be the essence of
sell from the first word to the last. Loose the fluff and fringes. They’re
for weddings not ad copy.

8) There’s No Place for Sexism or Racism

I was listening to an ad on a college radio station in the middle of the
summer semester. It was an ad for a local business. During the course of
this 30-second ad they managed to insult the Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Thai
and all women everywhere. Now needless to say that any type of racist or
sexist attitude doesn’t go far in advertising. But here we have a student
population, which during the summer, by the statistics taken each year, is
almost 30% of oriental origin and 65% female. Not only was this commercial
poor advertising, but just plain stupid.

Gender bashing, racist remarks and general rudeness offends people. You
don’t sell by offending others. The hardest of them to deal with is the use
of gender in your copy. How do you handle it? Instead of “service man”, it’s
“service person”. Instead of “his”, it’s “his/hers”. There are however a
couple of other ways to help deal with this problem. One is two use plurals.
Instead of his or her, try they, them or theirs. Another is to rewrite your
copy taking out any reference to sex at all. You may even try alternating
sexes through the ad copy.

Well, that’s it for now, hope you’re walking away with more than you came
with.

Listed above are just a few techniques that you can use to help you write
better ad copy.

Remember good copy sellsFree Reprint Articles, but great copy sells well!

Article Tags:
Selling Points

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Wild Bill Montgomery
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Article Tags:
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Wild Bill Montgomery
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When It’s Time For You To Get Down To Business,
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Web legalities copyright

… This article contains opinions and … about … Keep in mind that I am not a lawyer and have not been a lawyer in anypast life that I am aware of. If you have specific qu

Important: This article contains opinions and information about copyright
law. Keep in mind that I am not a lawyer and have not been a lawyer in any
past life that I am aware of. If you have specific questions about copyright
law you should contact the appropriate legal resources.

People work hard to develop graphics, write stories and articles, design web
sites and build software, among other things. They are sometimes paid for
their efforts, sometimes not. In any event, in the United States (and in
most of the world) anything that you create or write is automatically
protected by copyright.

You do not generally need to register your works with the copyright office
in order for them to be protected. Registration simply serves as added
insurance – it gives you the ability to prove that you wrote or created the
item on a specific date and formally establishes you as the copyright owner.

The person or company (if you create the work for a company it belongs to
the company) owns the rights to publish the material. These rights do not
stop no matter how many times the material is illegally copied or if the
copyright holder gives you a copy. He still owns the copyright unless he
signs it over to someone else.

The point is that taking someone’s images, writings, songs (MP3’s included),
videos or anything else is violating the law and the person’s rights. In
fact, it is stealing and, if proven, the violator can be held liable for
damages.

So what do you do when you see that cool graphic or sound file on the
internet and you want a copy? Well, you can write to the copyright owner and
ask permission to use it or to make a copy (always get written permission –
anything not in writing is difficult to prove in a court of law). Getting
permission is not difficult and it is rewarding to create a web site or
other work knowing that everything is totally legal.

I’ve found that most artists and writers on the internet are completely
willing to allow their work to be copied as long as they get credit and a
link back to their site. Occasionally I’ve found an exception – an author or
artist who does not want to allow casual copying. In this case the best
thing to do is to follow the wishes of the copyright owner – don’t copy the
material.

A good rule of thumb about using materials gleaned from the internet is: if
you have any doubts about being able to make copies, don’t use it. There are
way too many good public domain sites for clipart, music and video for there
to be any excuse for illegally using copyrighted material on your site.

One of the more interesting copyright violations occurred between the owner
of Star Trek (Viacom) and every non-sanctioned Star Trek site on the web.
Viacom decided that it didn’t agree with people using Star Trek photos,
graphics, stories and other materials as it owned the copyrights. So it send
out a letter to every site it could find telling them to cease desist. They
succeeded in alienating most of the Star Trek fans in the world and in
angering just about everyone … and most of the site still seem to be
operating. Yet, legally, Viacom is correct … they do own the copyrights.
But was it a good move to act the way that they did? I don’t think so, as
Star Trek has a huge fan following and allowing the fans to create literally
thousands of web sites is probably the best advertising that Viacom could
have asked for.

Some examples of behaviors that are commonly believed to be allowable which
are in fact illegal in the United States are:

– Taking images from newsgroups and posting them on your web site. Just
because something has been copied to a newsgroup, regardless of whether the
copy was made by the copyright owner or someone else, does not mean in any
form that the copyright has been given up.

– Using articles and images from other web sites. Again, this is illegal
unless explicit permission is given or the item in question is in the public
domain.

– Scanning images from magazines and posting them on your fan site. This is
illegal as you are making a copy (a scan) of a copyrighted image.

– Recording sound from your favorite television show and posting them to
your web site. Again, not legal.

– Getting permission from someone who has made a legitimate copy of the
material. The rule is simple: you must obtain permission from the copyright
owner or their legal agents.

– Modifying an image and claiming it as your own. Copyright protects
derivations of works as well.

On the other hand, the following are acceptable under the US copyright laws.

– Including a few brief quotes from a book in a review. This is acceptable
under fair use laws – see http://www.internet-tips.net/Legal/fairuse.htm

– Reprinting a confirmed public domain novel on your web site (public domain
is the theme of a future article in this series).

– Asking and obtaining reprint permission from the copyright owner or a
legal agent of the copyright owner.

– Reading an article about cheese puffs and writing your own article about
cheese puffs. Copyright protects creative works (writings, images,
paintings, sound and so on), not ideas or concepts. You are safe as long as
your work is not simply the same as the other work with the words changed.

The best advice is simple. When in doubt, ask permission. If you are denied
permission or for some reason cannot obtain itHealth Fitness Articles, then don’t use the material.

Article Tags:
Copyright Owner, Star Trek, Images From, Posting Them, Permission From

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Richard Lowe Jr. is the webmaster of Internet Tips And Secrets. This
website includes over 1,000 free articles to improve your internet
profits, enjoyment and knowledge.
Web Site Address: http://www.internet-tips.net
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Article Tags:
Copyright Owner, Star Trek, Images From, Posting Them, Permission From

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Richard Lowe Jr. is the webmaster of Internet Tips And Secrets. This
website includes over 1,000 free articles to improve your internet
profits, enjoyment and knowledge.
Web Site Address: http://www.internet-tips.net
Weekly newsletter: http://www.internet-tips.net/joinlist.htm
Daily Tips: mailto:internet-tips@GetResponse.com

Features vs benefits the mystery revealed

Whenever someone mentions … or sales you can be sure the phrase … vs. … will come up in short order. Everyone knows that phrase. Everyone knows that features don’t sell, bene

Whenever someone mentions advertising or sales you can be sure the phrase “features vs. benefits” will come up in short order. Everyone knows that phrase. Everyone knows that features don’t sell, benefits do. However, exactly what is a benefit and how do you turn features into them?

Let’s get some definitions set forth first. A feature is an attribute of a product or service. Web site hosting companies will often tell you there package offers “catch all” email addressing. That’s a feature. That type of email is a mechanical part of the hosting package.

To determine the benefit, you look at how the catch all email adds value to the customer. In other words, “What’s in it for me”?

The customer doesn’t care about the mechanical feature of the hosting. What they do care about is how the catch all email can improve their life. Catch all email allows anything typed before the “@domainname.com” to go through the system and make it to the “primary” email box. The benefit of catch all email is that even messages with a misspelling in them make it through so you stay in contact with your customers. Every online business owner cares about that.

One of the most effective ways to derive benefits from features is to address problems or concerns your customers have. Let’s turn our attention to the ebook industry for a moment and define some concerns these customers might have.

When publishing an ebook, the concern is primarily about getting the information across to readers. It needs to be in a format they can readily access. While reading the sales copy for some ebook compilers, the phrase “no reader required” came up. This is a feature. It didn’t mean much to me until I read the benefit

The benefit of “no reader required” is that the software is complete within itself. Unlike some ebook compilers that require the ebook purchaser to download special software in order to view the book, this feature offered the benefit of being all-inclusive. As soon as the book was downloaded, the customer could begin reading without further delays. That spoke to the concern and answered the question, “What’s in it for me”.

As you can probably tell by now, the benefits are what make a difference to your customer. The benefits – more or less – explain why the feature is important. This is why benefits have selling power and most features do not.

Here are a few steps you can use when working with the features vs. benefits equation:

1. List the features of your product or service. (Catch All Email.)

2. Next, list the concerns or needs of your customers. If you don’t know… ask them. (Being able to get emails even if misspellings or other mistakes occur.)

3. Next, ask yourself, “Why does this feature matter to my customer”? Write your answers on the list. (Catch all email allows you to stay in touch with your customers.)

4. Finally, take it one step further. As yourself, “What problem or concern can this feature address”? (You can know that any email sent to anyname@domainname.com will make it through to you.)

5. Write down the benefit.

By explaining your sales information in language the customer can understand you are helping them reach the point of purchase more quickly. So, the next time you create an adFree Articles, be sure to focus on the information that’s important to your customers… benefits.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Butch Pujol offers a safe haven for online business owners. Whether you’re a Newbie or a Pro, you’ll find legitimate and safe Internet business solutions and tools that can help your company grow. Visit http://www.safeinternetbusiness.com today.
Karon Thackston is President of KT & Associates who offers targeted copywriting, advertising assistance and ezine article services. Karon’s Web site is located at http://www.ktamarketing.com.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Butch Pujol offers a safe haven for online business owners. Whether you’re a Newbie or a Pro, you’ll find legitimate and safe Internet business solutions and tools that can help your company grow. Visit http://www.safeinternetbusiness.com today.
Karon Thackston is President of KT & Associates who offers targeted copywriting, advertising assistance and ezine article services. Karon’s Web site is located at http://www.ktamarketing.com.

Back to the copywriting basics

You’ve probably read lots on effective copywriting strategies, how toutilise keywords, and various tricks of the trade for making sure yourcopywriting is as effective as possible. This is good stuff ….

You’ve probably read lots on effective copywriting strategies, how to
utilise keywords, and various tricks of the trade for making sure your
copywriting is as effective as possible. This is good stuff … anything
that results in a better website is worth reading and absorbing.

However, before you learn to walk, you need to learn to crawl. Before you
begin focusing on the technical aspects of copywriting, it’s a good idea to
get a handle on the basics.

With that in mind, here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re
pecking away at your keyboard, trying to come up with effective copy for
your site.

* Catch your visitor’s attention right away. They’ll be gone in two seconds
otherwise.
* Keep it short. Keep it simple. Keep it to the point.
* Along the same lines, focus. Don’t try to do too much with one article or
one page of copy. You’re not a novelist – you’re selling your services or
product.
* Use the active tense … don’t say “the product can be bought by clicking
on this link”, say “click on this link to buy the product”.
* Don’t use jargon. You’re writing to inform, to convince and to sell, not
to confuse.
* If you have a choice between a small word and a big word, use the small word.
* Keep a dictionary at hand, and use it.
* Know your audience. If you’re targeting university professors, you won’t
write the same kind of copy you’d aim at skateboarders (unless your target
audience is skateboarding university professors – in which case you’ve got
problems).
* Keep the tone consistent. If you’re writing using an informal,
conversational style, don’t switch in midstream to a formal legalistic
style. It’ll throw your readers off.
* Tell the truth. Not only will you avoid being sued, but you’ll achieve
credibility. This translates into long term profitability. Trust us.
* Similar to the last point, don’t exaggerate. Kill the superlatives and
the exclamation marks. Let the reader decide if they’re excited or not. If
you’ve done your job, they will be.
* For website copy, use bullets and point form, and break up copy with
subheads. Short attention spans and monitor-induced eyestrain make this
essential.
* Forget word counts and padding your copy. Say what you have to say – if
it only takes 150 words to get your message out (or 75, or even 25), that’s
a good thing. You’ve made your point, and your reader can move on and buy
your product or service.
* After you’ve finished writing, read your copy out loud to yourself.
You’ll be surprised at how many mistakes you’ll catch this way. It also
lets you know if your writing has a natural flow to it.
* Don’t fall in love with a particular phrase or paragraph, no matter how
great it sounds. Ask yourself, ‘does it fit into the objective of my copy?’
If the answer is no, kill it.
* Don’t be happy with your first draft. Edit, rewrite, and edit some more.
On the other hand, you’re not following in the footsteps of Hemingway …
don’t overedit or overanalyze, or you’ll never finish the job.
* When you’re done, be receptive to constructive criticism. Let others read
your work before it goes online, and if they point out mistakesFree Articles, rewrite.

Following the above advice will go a long way to ensuring your web copy is
readable and does what it’s supposed to do – promote your business.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Laing is a copywriter and the content creator for
http://www.graphicsandwords.com , a website featuring graphic design and
copywriting resources for newsletter editors/publishers, webmasters and
other creative professionals.










Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Laing is a copywriter and the content creator for
http://www.graphicsandwords.com , a website featuring graphic design and
copywriting resources for newsletter editors/publishers, webmasters and
other creative professionals.

Copyright

What is … No one can … your work with-out your … – not even a personal letter. How much of a writer’s work can be … used? A poem of 40-50 words is … consid

What is copyright? No one can reproduce your work with-
out your permission – not even a personal letter. How much
of a writer’s work can be legitimately used? A poem of 40-50
words is generally considered to be OK. Usually one is not
allowed to copy substantial amounts of another writer’s work
without their express permission.

* But then what is meant by the word “substantial”? It is
widely open to interpretation and opens up a literary and
legal “minefield” (that’s a metaphor, by the way!).

There are no hard and fast guidelines about the rule of copy-
right. The following is a rough ‘rule of thumb’:

You can take approximately 300 words from a book or any
other lengthy work of writing. You can also quote 150 words
from a magazine article. Fifty (50) words quoted from a news-
paper article is generally considered to be “fair use” without
requiring either permission or a fee. Copyright lasts 50 years
after your death.

You can use what is termed ‘fair dealing’ in writing reports,
or researching material. I always advise acknowledging sources
in your reference section (the bibliography –
I tried very hard to bring in that impressive long word) .

It’s all very unclear – the entire subject of copyright; so I
won’t say too much. My simple words of advice are:
Just use your common sense and
discretion (if you have some)… and be HONEST by fol-
lowing your heart. Don’t copy other author’s material and
purport (nice word, eh?) to be the author. One should not
paraphrase a substantial amount of another author’s writing,
nor use that writer’s points (or theme of their writing)
without due ACKNOWLEDGMENT. Hint hint!

If you get into a dispute (oops!), there are specialised trade
and copyright laywers (or solicitors as they call them here in
‘civilised’ NZ) in the big centres. If in doubt, get advice…then
DON’T infringe copyright.

Send requests to use “borrowed” material to the permissions
editor of a magazine, newspaper or book publisher. Book
publishers usually have a small department which deals solely
in this. Give them as much information as possible about your
article or book, your publisher, as well as other books or articles
written by you. Tell them what quotes you want to use and
why and so on. Say you will give them due acknowledgement
in your writing. They’ll usually oblige.

There is sometimes a small fee payable. Always acknowledge
the sources of your quotations – then you’ve kept your word,
your side of the “bargain”.

Also keep copies of your correspondence in the event of an
unlikely dispute.

Now a bit for Kiwis (and Brits)…

No one can reproduce your work without your permission.
New Zealand law closely follows British law. In NZ copyright
is usually protected for 50 years after the author’s death. If a
book is published posthumously (nice long word that),
copyright extends for 75 years after the time of the author’s
death. After that the work can be freely used by anyone.
No hope for me then… but perhaps my great great grand-
children!

As from 1989, New Zealand copyright law requires 3 copies
of every NZ publication to go to the National Library in
Wellington. One of which goes to the Alexander Turnbull
Library, one to the National Library for bibliographical pur-
poses, while the third is kept at the Parliamentary Library in
the capital in Wellington.

Sometimes a publisher might want copyright in exchange for
a fee. My advice: It’s your work of art. So always retain your
copyright… unless you are in dire financial straits, like this
aspiring (and perspiring) writer. *

In the next lesson (and article) we will look at the subject of
plagiarism . Wow, that’s a big word and I hope I spelt it cor-
rectly (especially for you “slick Americans”)!

No , I don’t mind you using my material and I feel, it may be
very hard for another “writer” to closely copy my rather “wacky style
of hopefully informing and entertaining at the same time”.

AnywayFree Web Content, isn’t “imitation the sincerest form of flattery”?

Article Tags:
Years After

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Craig Lock is an author of numerous books and the
creator of the ORIGINAL online creative writing
course.
http://www.nzenterprise.com/writer/creative.html










Article Tags:
Years After

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Craig Lock is an author of numerous books and the
creator of the ORIGINAL online creative writing
course.
http://www.nzenterprise.com/writer/creative.html

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